Summer to sizzle at the Jerusalem Season of Culture

For five years, the Jerusalem Season of culture has been ushering in an assortment of creative events emanating straight from Jerusalem.

This summers program is expected to build on the very complex, and uniquely artistic and cultural backdrop of Jerusalem in all its complexity ad color. A number of fantastic events are schedule throughout the summer and Breaking Bread Journeys highly recommends that if you want to truly taste Jerusalem in all its glory, make sure to participate in one of these upcoming events.

In-House Festival: July 27-31

The In-House Festival will explore the meaning of “home” in public spaces. In the project HaKol Galui, for example, we will invite participants (in collaboration with the architectural department of the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design) to a fascinating sound work among the abandoned homes of the Lifta village where Palestinians lived before being replaced by immigrants from Yemen and Kurdistan. Today the area is mainly frequented by ultra-orthodox men who come to swim in the natural springs, homeless people who are looking for a broken roof over their heads, and property sharks. Renana Raz will re-examine the hearing concerning a complaint against the teacher Adam Verete that was posted on Facebook by one of his students. This pivotal event, which raised questions about the limits of democracy, the status of the educator and whether or not freedom of speech really exists, is treated to some fascinating and extraordinary artistic therapy which will take place in The Israeli Democracy Institute.

Contact Point: August 6  (We love this!)

A magical night of art and people at the Israel Museum will bring dozens of artists together to present a number of contact points produced especially for the 50th jubilee year, including the “The Exhibition of Exhibitions that Never Were” in which we will reveal the exhibitions that were not staged for a variety of different reasons, and “Catalogues,” in which the catalogues that have been issued by the museum over the last 50 years will be used to make new works.

Knock Knock: August 9-13

Night. A standard hotel room in the center of Jerusalem. You approach the reception desk, check in and receive your key. This is the first step in a unique theatrical experience that will bring the audience together with actors, musicians, chefs, chambermaids, dancers, broadcasters and directors who will create intimate, surprising and very special experiences. Feel free to let go, lose yourself, go wild, hide away, or immerse yourself in thought.

Frontline: August 16-20

Back for the third time Frontline presents Jerusalem’s independent music scene. Among other things, there will be an abstract concert by brilliant electronic artist, Gilbert, playing a vintage keyboard or Marki Funk’s psychedelic groove project 

Under the Mountain: August 23-28

The Under the Mountain Festival of New Public Art will focus on history’s biggest and most important stage—the Temple Mount. No doubt this artistic expression with some 20 artists will be newsworthy.

The Jerusalem Sacred Music Festival August 30-September 4

In its 4 th year, the Jerusalem Sacred Music Festival will brings together musicians from all religions from around the world for collaborative and engaging performances

The extended, week-long festival will unfold in five locations and include 25 performances by a long and exciting list of musicians and artists from 16 countries: Jonny Greenwood (UK) and Shye Ben Tzur in an international debut that combines East and West in Rajasthan, Shuli Rand will perform songs recorded by the guru of secularity, Meir Ariel, Mark and Piris Eliyahu will lead the Maqam Ensemble, pianist Omri Mor will play with legendary Algerian drummer, Karim Ziad, Mohammad Reza Mortazavi (Iran) and Zohar Fresco (Israel) will drum together on the same stage, Itamar Doari will appear in an exclusive performance with the best of Spain’s Flamenco, and Max Romeo, one of the founding fathers of reggae, will light up Zion.

For additional information:

Tamar Gur: 052-3024949 tamar@jsoc.org.il

Kim Weiss: 054-5377130 kim@jsoc.org.il

To purchase tickets:

http://www.jerusalemseason.com/

02-6535854

box@jsoc.org.il

 

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Categories: Art, Culture, events, Jerusalem

Tel Aviv Night Run

On Tuesday, Oct. 28, thousands of Israelis will be coming together at 8:00pm.  Not for a political event, or a concert.  It is for the non-stop city of Tel Aviv’s Night Run.  The urban 10K course goes through the main streets and attractions of the city.  The course includes:

Rabin Square: This is named after Prime Minister Yitzchak Rabin, who was assassinated in this square in 1995.  It is the location for numerous political rallies, parades, and other public events, including the Tel Aviv Night Run!
IMPORTANT NOTE: No, Rabin did not ironically get assassinated at a Square named for him.  Prior to his assassination, it was known as the Kings of Israel Square.  

Ibn Gabirol Street: This is a popular street filled with shops, cafes, and restaurants.  It is named after a medieval Hebrew poet and Jewish philosopher.  His writings are included in versions of today’s Jewish prayer book.

Rothschild Boulevard: This street is easily identifiable because of the wide, tree-lined pedestrian and bike lanes placed in the center of the road.  Independence Hall (where Israel’s Declaration of Independence was signed) is located here.

The Orchestra Plaza: This plaza is where several cultural institutions are located including a theatre and pavilion for contemporary art.  The idea to have this central location for culture was proposed in the 1920s and was complete in 1945.  This is also known as Habima Square.

Dizengoff: This street is named after the first mayor of Tel Aviv, Meir Dizengoff.  Located on this street is the popular Dizengoff Center mall.

Hayarkon Park: This urban park is the central place for outdoor concerts and includes spacious lawns, sports facilities, gardens, and a water park! It has been recorded that annually, this park has on average 16 million visitors.

Information about registration for the Night Run Tel  Aviv can be found HERE.

Additionally, there are runners who want to participate in a running event that is not commercialized.  Therefore, on Thursday, Oct. 30, there will be an open night run event.  Below is the background for why this event is happening and more information can be found HERE.

Note: Most of the information on the websites are in Hebrew.  No worries, though, just copy and paste the text you want translated into translate.google.com 

 

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You might be wondering what Sukkot is and how can it possibly make sense to say “Celebrating Sukkot in Sukkot.”  This post will clear up that confusion.

Currently throughout the Holy Land and world, Jews are celebrating the holiday of Sukkot.  Sukkot is an easily identifiable holiday because it is the holiday when Jews are commanded to live in temporary outdoor booths.  A single booth is called a sukkah, and multiple booths are called sukkot, hence the name of the holiday. [Note: for the rest of this post “sukkot” refers to booths and “Sukkot” refers to the name of the holiday.]

This holiday lasts for a week and is one of the three pilgrimage festivals. During a pilgrimage festival, biblical Israelites would make their pilgrimage with their fresh crops to sacrifice at the Temple in Jerusalem.

The purpose of building and essentially living in a sukkah for the week is to remember that biblical Israelites wandered in the desert for 40 years after the exodus from Egypt.  While they wandered they, too, lived in temporary booths.  Additionally, since a sukkah is a basic structure, this holiday is an opportunity to reflect on what in your life is superficial.  It is a time to differentiate between your “wants” and “needs.”

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish children play between sukkahs, temporary structures built for the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in Jerusalem. [original picture and caption from Haaretz.com]

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish children play between sukkahs, temporary structures built for the Jewish holiday of Sukkot, in Jerusalem. [original picture and caption from Haaretz.com]

It is amazing to be on a Holy Land tour during Sukkot.  Specifically in Jerusalem you will see sukkot wherever you go.  Some are on balconies and others are on the sidewalk.  Most restaurants build sukkot for their customers to eat in.  It is a social holiday where neighbors and even strangers interact with each other.

There are many Jewish Laws regarding the structure of a sukkah. A fun, interactive way to learn about these laws is at the life-size sukkah exhibit Neot Kedumim park.  This exhibit is great for adults and children and is located halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv.  Throughout the Neot Kedumim park there are dozens of examples of correct and incorrect sukkot accompanied with a sign containing the Jewish Law.

Additionally, there are many events and festivals happening throughout the Holy Land during Sukkot.  Click HERE to see a compiled list.

 

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"The Benevolent Tree" Art Exhibition

In the midst of the fall holiday season that includes Jewish high holidays of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur followed by Sukkot and the Muslim holiday of Eid – the site of blossoming trees throughout the Holy Land can’t help but remind us that the fall harvesting season is fast approaching. During the month of October, Palestinians and Israelis alike will begin harvesting their fields.  The Holy Land is the home for some of the oldest olive trees, which are about 4,000 years old.  For Palestinians, the olive tree is important for economic and symbolic reasons.  The olive tree parallels to the Palestinian connection to their land.  Olive trees are drought-resistant and can grow in poor soil conditions.  Similarly, Palestinians are resilient and continue to survive and resist for their independence.

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

This is a popular time for people with different backgrounds coming together to harvest the olive trees.  From my experience, some Palestinians are not allowed to harvest their olive tree fields because of the Israeli army or Jewish settlers.  To assist these Palestinian farmers, internationals play an important role.  There are dozens of organized opportunities to experience the olive harvest.

Since the olive harvest is approaching, an art exhibit focusing on olive trees recently opened and will be on display until December 13, 2014.  The exhibit is located in the primarily Israeli Arab city of Umm el-Fahem and is called “The Benevolent Tree.”

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

The gallery is three stories with multiple rooms.  According to the gallery’s description, the exhibition “is an attempt by 78 Israeli and Palestinian artists, to reinvigorate the broader discussion on the essence, importance and symbolism of the olive tree.”  Continuing, the description says, “the sanctity of the olive tree has become intertwined with the sanctity of the land, to form a single entity symbolizing the difficult arguments and bloody conflict that have been going on for years on end.”

 

For more information about the Umm el-Fahem Art Gallery click HERE.

Below are additional photos for a sneak peak of the exhibit. 

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

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Photo courtesy Debbie Hill for Breakingbreadjourneys.com

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Categories: Art, events

f792bc01b699f4d5604671454a646e17International Day of Peace is coming up this Sunday, September 21!

Quick Facts:

– This day is dedicated to world peace and was first celebrated in 1982.

–  This day is respected by many nations, political groups, military groups, and peoples.

– This year has a theme, which is “Rights of People to Peace.”  This theme is in honor of the 30th year of the UN Declaration’s Rights of People to Peace.

While being on a Holy Land tour, there are always conversations about why there is not peace in the Holy Land.  Participating on a Breaking Bread Journeys tour is incredible because in addition to experiencing the Holy Land, you can intimately learn the perspective of an Israeli and a Palestinian.  Additionally, Breaking Bread Journeys actively supports peace and sustainability efforts.

In a recent article about Breaking Bread Journeys, it mentions that “most tours spend half a day in Palestinian areas, resulting in about 10 cents for each tourist dollar spent going to the local economy, but Breaking Bread Journeys’ programs result in more money going directly to these communities, [co-founder Elisa] Moed said. ‘We design our programs to up that substantially,’ typically returning 27 cents on each tourist dollar spent, she said. ‘It’s our way to improve lives and further peace and stability.’ Samara Tourist and Travel Agency is receiving support for marketing and promotion of Breaking Bread Journeys from the United States Agency for International Development, as part of the agency’s strategy to develop the Palestinian tourism sector and to make a significant impact in job creation and investment, as a path to peace and stability.”

"Peace to a land that was created for peace, and never saw a peaceful day."  ~  Mahamoud Darwish
“Peace to a land that was created for peace, and never saw a peaceful day.”
~ Mahamoud Darwish

 

By clicking here, you can read about actions you can take to participate in this global Day of Peace. These ideas include include individual as well as global actions. One I found interesting is Peace Breathing. Also, there is an organization called Peace One Day, which is dedicated to spreading awareness of this global day of peace, as well as reducing violence on this day.

What will you do this year to celebrate International Day of Peace?

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Come July, August and September the weather isn’t the only thing hot about Jerusalem. There are plenty of festivals and special events that are sizzling throughout the summer months. Breaking Bread Journeys has compiled a list of some of the most exciting activities that are coming up over the next two months. Mark your calendars now and start planning your long weekend in Jerusalem.

1. Israel Museum – Exhibition Big Bambu
When: June 6 – October 1, 2014
What: An incredible 16 meter high installation by two American artists and twin brothers, Doug and Mike Starn, featuring over 10,000 bamboo poles, 80 kilometers of rope. A specially selected team of rock climbers created this exiting exhibit which allows visitors to explore by climbing through a ‘bamboo forest’. Additional fee of 10NIS per adult and 5 NIS per child (in addition to museum entrance ticket).

Doug and Mike Starns bamboo installation at the Israel Museum

Doug adn Mike Starns bamboo installation at the Israel Museum

2. Israel Museum – Contact Point
When – July 10, 2014
What – Artists from different disciplines gather at the museum to create a special contact point between themselves and an artwork.

3. In House Festival
When: July 7 – 11, 2014
What: Several of Jerusalem’s intriguing artist homes will open their doors to the public and provides visitors with an opportunity to learn from the artists about the many stories behind these homes. Several unique productions will take place during the festival

4. Israel Camerata Jerusalem – The Tempest
When: July 8, 2014
What: Israel Camerata orchestra performance of The Tempest with Avner Biron conductor and Itamar Zorman violinist. Jerusalem Theater, Henry Crown Hall. 02-560-5755

5. 31st Annual Jerusalem Film Festival
When: July 10- 20
What: This 10 day Jerusalem festival some of the best Israeli and world cinema as well as panels, workshops and more.

6. Jerusalem Beer Festival
When: August 7 – 8, 2014
What: – If you like beer than this is the festival for you. In its 9th year, this two day festival takes place at Independence Park, in the center of Jerusalem, and showcases over 120 types of local beers.

7. Jerusalem Wine Festival – Israel Museum
When: August 11 – 14, 2014
What: A wine lovers dream – this exceptional festival features wines from over 60 large and small boutique wineries throughout the region and is complimented by live evening entertainment in the museum’s beautiful Rose Garden.

8. Jerusalem International Puppet Theatre
When: August 10 – 14, 2014
What: An exciting week of visual entertainment from exceptional artists. Geared for children and adults alike.

9. Jerusalem Arts & Crafts Festival (Hutzot Hayotzer)
When: August 11 – 23, 2014
What: This 12 day cultural festival (now in its 39th year) features over 200 artisans as well as open air concerts from some of Israel’s most celebrated entertainers. Fun for the entire family!

10. Between Fork and Knife Culinary Festival
When: August 20 – September 7, 2014
What: First time ever – two renowned local Jerusalem chefs, Kamel Hashlamon and Assaf Granit one Jewish, one Arab, both born in Jerusalem come together in a unique culinary dialogue experience every evening in a stunning, quirky building on Mount Zion, adjacent to the site of the last supper, King David’s tomb, the village of Silwan, the Temple Mount and the Western Wall.

11. Formula 1 Race
When: August 28 – 29, 2014
What: An exciting two days watching race cars speed through the Holy City

12. Sacred Music Festival
When: September 9 – 12, 2014
What: An unprecedented program filled with dozens of artists and musicians from all over the world with rich performances that echo Jerusalem’s profound diversity. A unique experience to be found only in Jerusalem.

13. The Book of Books – at the Bible Lands Museum
When: Ongoing through October 25, 2014
What: A historic exhibition that traces over 2000 years of the Bible by displaying examples of the most extraordinary and important biblical texts ever seen, including texts from the Septuagint, the Cairo Geniza and the Gutenberg Bible.

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Breaking Bread Journeys
P.O.Box 14058
E. Jerusalem 91140
Phone: +1 (561) 910-0640
info@breakingbreadjourneys.com

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